Articolo a cura di Marco Bonora, Federico Pizzileo e Valentina Moracci Quando si parla di “Mito” si parla di racconti. I soggetti principali dei quali risultano essere Eroi del passato, Antenati, Spiriti o Divinità.  Questi racconti a seconda della persona a cui se ne chiede opinione, ricevono significati più o meno profondi. Se si disquisisce di “Mito” con individui senza nessuna propensione sacrale, si sentirà descriverli semplicemente come racconti a sfondo fantastico-favolistico creati dai popoli antichi per dare spiegazioni di cose a loro sconosciute, come per esempio i fenomeni naturali o la creazione del mondo. Qualora invece se ne discuta con individui propensi a un certo tipo di filosofia, e\o attivi inContinua a leggere…

Translation by Federico Pızzıleo The phenomena of death and all other common events in daily life have given rise to speculations about the invisible world, which have gradually led to a distinction, albeit slight at all times, between good spirits and bad spirits. This division in the Christian era found fertile ground, as well as in all monotheistic faiths, which spent and cultivated the seed of ignorance, oppressing historically antecedent cultures and realities. Magic, astrology and witchcraft have become fashionable in recent times, due to the new age and neo-pagan movements that have helped, yes, but also dirtied occult art. The appeal of the mysterious and the occult to contemporary audiences hasContinua a leggere…

Today I want to draw attention to an excerpt from C. Peter’s thesis in Vernacular psychologies in Old Norse-Icelandic and Old English, which examines the vernacular psychology presented in the ancient Norwegian-Icelandic texts. The part that catches my interest focuses on the concept “hugr”, generally translated in English as “mind, soul, spirit” and explores the conceptual relationships between emotion, cognition and body. The thesis introduces the range of intercultural varieties into psychological concepts, placing the Old Norse and Icelandic “hugr”, with its Old English analogue “mōd”, in a typological perspective. In fact, it outlines the original psychological model of Old Norse-Icelandic, examining the vernacular texts originally produced. First, it examines the claimsContinua a leggere…

Based on the news that emerged regarding a possible article that clarifies the presence of volcanic cult areas in Iceland, precisely in Surtshellir, we could not help but give you excerpts from this beautiful study. With all the calm of the case and without drawing hasty conclusions, we will make an excursus following some steps of the archaeological work that you will find in the bibliography.As an esotericist and archaeologist, I will not fail to give my personal conclusions, with interesting data in hand, to guarantee a 360-degree view of the event, since the theories are many and are not yet ascertained, but this does not take away the possibility of relatingContinua a leggere…

Translation by Federico P. The Fylgjur have long been associated (and not) with the witch’s companions. We find this in many Icelandic folk tales, especially in ancient Nordic literature and pagan belief; is a view supported by both Jón Árnason and the eminent folklorist Einar Ólafur Sveinsson. Despite their obvious differences, significant similarities persist between ancient fylgjur figures and medieval visions. Understanding how the fylgjur of the ancient era and the medieval era relate to each other facilitates the understanding of how witchcraft evolved during religious development in Iceland, starting with the pre-Christian era and moving through Christianization and beyond. Many of these later folk tales have not yet been translated intoContinua a leggere…

Originally published in Alb Italia. Article in honor of Timo Ketola The term Grimoire derives from an Old French term ‘gram(m)aire’.It originally referred to a book written in Latin, but soon this association was more specific to denote a book of magic. The word grimoire brings us back to the concept of a book full of writing suitable for communication.Direct communication with the hidden forces of the universe, both demonic and divine. A common feature of many grimoires is the use of strange alphabets, digits, and signs to represent specific gods, demons, or other hidden forces.In Scandinavia, precisely in Sweden, black art grimoires were called Svartkonstböcker or Trolldomsböcker witchcraft books;In Iceland galdrabækur. NowContinua a leggere…

Translation by Irene Benetti, Federico Pizzileo, Federico Montemarano, Sonia Francesconi, Elio Antenucci, Arjen Lantis and Emanuele Uccello Abstract: Through analysis and research, and with the help of the most important anthropologists of the sacred, this article sets the objective of giving a homogeneous framework on the differences, on the evolution and characteristics of the so-called “religion”, also linked to Traditio. At last, we will demonstrate that real consistency is necessary on the part of those who profess against religions or are atheist. In monotheistic thought, God is conceived as the supreme being, a creative divinity, the main object of faith. The concept of God for monotheists includes attributes of omniscience, omnipotence, omnipresence.Continua a leggere…

The text of the Völuspá encompasses much of the witchcraft practice of Vanatrú. The song, referring to the logos of terms such as Góð and Ragnarök, compresses in a few esoteric verses the generating, destroying and receiving act of the new era typical of the Vanatrú tradition. In Völuspá the Völva remembers and foresees. To see becomes spá linked above all to the act of vision during one of the descent shamanic practices. Full of memories. The völva is spá / kona (seer) but it is also vísinda / kona (woman of science). We never find the word “spá” within the song, but the term ég man (I remember), which refers toContinua a leggere…

Today we want to introduce a video-article and a research work exogenous to the association, but which we believe to be significant from several points of view. Created by Arith Härger, a leading archaeologist and scholar of the international heathen landscape, this examination promises to provide a conceptual structure rich in specific notions that shed light on the deities linked to Mother Earth in the Germanic and pre-Christian context. In addition to his painstaking work, we also underline his presentation and quotation from Vanatrú Italia (which you can find starting at 01:06). So that his splendid words reserved for our research work will never be lost in the Internet ether, and alsoContinua a leggere…

Per la versione italiana clicca qui! Check this link for the original english version of this conversation on www.askrsvarte.org Traduction de Federico Montemarano A: Hail! Veuillez vous présenter et présenter votre association italienne à notre public Y: Hail  Askr,Permettez-moi de me présenter: je suis Ylenia Oliverio, alias Laugrith Heid, je suis une archéologue italienne qui pratique l’ésotérisme depuis environ 25 ans. J’ai commencé mon voyage avec Goetia et la démonologie. Entre 2012 et 2013, j’ai fondé une association reconnue par l’État italien, sectorisée au culte polythéiste. Entre 2013 et 2014, j’ai concentré mon attention sur la zone scandinave, en fondant Vanatrú Italia, à partir des processus runologiques liés à la graine desContinua a leggere…